http://

Come For The Workout Stay For The Coffee from Kenny Kane on Vimeo.

Monday’s Workout
Practice

A) 3 RFQ:
     7 Tempo Back Squats 3131
     7 Hang Power Snatches
     Max effort high knees on breath hold
     *Rest coach’s interval

B) EMOM 10:
     Odds: 8 Hang Power Snatches
     Even: 5 Bar Muscle-ups

C) Box Squats

Tuesday’s Workout
Competition

AMRAP 5:
     12 Lateral Burpees
     6 Deadlifts (225/155)
     *Rest 3 Minutes
AMRAP 4:
     12 Lateral Burpees
     6 Deadlifts (275/195)
     *Rest 2 Minutes
AMRAP 3:
     12 Lateral Burpees
     6 Deadlifts (315/220)

Score = Total Rounds + Reps

You guys, next time you come to the gym, grab a can of something or that extra tub of peanut butter you bought at Trader Joe’s (unopened for god’s sake), and bring it in for our Westside Food Bank Drive. I know! I keep forgetting, too. But let’s fill up those bins in the Tall Room. There are only four measly cans in there as I type.

Westside Food Bank has been serving the local communities since 1981. About 90% of their food is distributed to individuals and families via food pantries that provide free bags of groceries. The rest is provided at shelters, transitional living sites, community kitchens and after school and preschool programs. During 2017 their food reached approximately 105,000 people, nearly half of whom are children.

Here are a list of what to bring from the Westside Food Bank website:

“The following are the types of food we like to receive:  (no glass please, except for baby food.)

Please make sure that all food donated has not been opened if it is not individually wrapped, and that the inner packaging is still intact. Please, no expired food.

Cans of:

  • Tuna, Vegetables, and Soup
  • Fruits and Fruit Juices
  • Pork & Beans
  • Stews & Other Meats

Packaged Foods:

  • Pasta, Lentils, Pinto and other beans.
  • Macaroni & Cheese & Packaged Dinners
  • Instant Soups
  • Hot and Cold Cereals
  • Peanut Butter & other Nut Butters
  • Nutritional Bars: protein, granola, energy or breakfast bars

Baby foods are also urgently needed. Sadly, two thousand babies and toddlers are without adequate nutrition each day right here on the Westside of Los Angeles.  We want to help them receive the nutrition they need to grow and develop into strong and healthy children.  We now have a special section at our warehouse devoted exclusively to infant and toddler nutrition so that our member agencies have easy access to the foods that are so vital to the health and well-being of the children in our community.

Please consider collecting the following items:

  • Infant formula
  • Jar foods – all flavors and stages
  • Crackers, teething biscuits, and cookies
  • Raisins & fruit snacks
  • Juices: jars, cans, pouches and boxes
  • Infant and children’s cereals

Friday’s Workout
Competition

Franklin Hill
“Up Over Around and Up”
2 Rounds on the 15:00

Saturday’s Workout

 

Monday’s Workout
Practice

A) 3 RFQ:
7 Tempo Back Squats 3131
7 Hang Power Snatches
Max effort high knees on breath hold
Rest coach’s interval

B) EMOM 10:
Odds: 8 Hang Power Snatches
Even: 5 Bar Muscle-ups

C) Box Squats

CrossFit Games Open Workouts 19.1, 19.2, and 19.3 are in the books. Two weekends and two workouts remain. Make a point to get into the gym on Saturday to attack 19.4. Do not be dissuaded by the movements – like everything else, it can be scaled to your capacity. Choose to do these challenging workouts, because people like us do things like this.

___________

THURSDAY

PRACTICE

A) 6 RFQ :40:20

     Double Unders

     C2B Pull-ups

B) 5 Rounds of: AMRAP 2:

     10 Hang Power Cleans (135/95)

     15 DB Thrusters (50/35)

     Rest 1 minute between rounds

FRIDAY

COMPETITION

Franklin Hill “Up, Over, Around and Up”

2 Rounds on the 15:00

WEDNESDAY – MENTAL TOUGHNESS

“Silber Lining” FT
400m Run
12 Alt Pistols
16 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
20 DB Russian Twists
800m Run
24 Alt Pistols
32 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
40 DB Russian Twists
1250m Run
36 Alt Pistols
48 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
60 DB Russian Twists

(40 min cap)


THURSDAY – PRACTICE

A) 6 RFQ :40:20
Double Unders
C2B

B) 5 Rounds of:
AMRAP 2: 10
Hang Power Cleans (135/95)
15 DB Thrusters (50/35)

Rest 1 minute between rounds


 

Well, for one, Austyn has been a kickass member of Oak Park for the past 8 and a half months. Many of you have gotten to throw down beside her.

When I first met Austyn last summer, I immediately picked up on how deeply she cares,  thinks about, and is invested in her own growth, so she can better serve the athletes she works with as an Athletic Trainer. This type of drive that Austyn has resonates and inspires me. Therefore, I knew shortly after meeting her that I wanted to get her on my podcast: Behind the Podium–Unveiling the Coach

The finished product is here (you can also find on iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Play), and I am excited to have our Oak Park community learn more about Austyn from my interview of her. For some additional context, we recorded this last August. 

We cover:

  • How to serve your clients from a physical and mental standpoint
  • Why letting go of perfection can help you move closer towards your bigger purpose
  • Why letting your clients take ownership of their healing can help you help them
  • How to help clients when their motivation is waning
  • Why learning to listen can be your greatest asset
  • Why it’s important to be strong in your weak points

Tuesday
Practice 
A) Ski Erg
    -Sprint start into 21 Cal (Gear 3)
    -Sprint start into 9 Cal (Gear 5)
B) Weighted Pull-up
    -Build to a heavy 2
C) 4RFQ :60:30
    -Weighted Squat/Lunge Complex
    -Max Cal Row (fewest strokes)

Wednesday
Mental Toughness
“Silber Lining”
     FT
    400m Run
    12 Alt Pistols
    16 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
    20 DB Russian Twists
    800m Run
    24 Alt Pistols
    32 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
    40 DB Russian Twists
    1250m Run
    36 Alt Pistols
    48 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
    60 DB Russian Twists (40 min cap)

http://

Shirley Brown Celebration Week from Kenny Kane on Vimeo.

Monday’s Workout
Practice
A) Evil Wheels
     5 x 5

B) EMOM 12
     O: Shirley’s Pull Complex
     E: Dball Shuttle Carry

C) Box Squats

Tuesday’s Workout
Practice

A) Ski Erg Power Sprints
     Sprint start into 21 Cal (Gear 3)
     Sprint start into 9 Cal (Gear 5)

B) Weighted Pull-up
     Build to a heavy 2

C) 4RFQ :60:30
Weighted Squat/Lunge Complex
Max Cal Row (fewest strokes)

How intriguing is fasting, amirite? I mean, the thought of fasting really interests me, but the actual fasting part maybe not so much. But if warriors, philosophers, scientists, and highly revered religious leaders  have recommended fasting and have reaped many benefits from it since the dawn of time, I’d say that’s a solid, long-ass study on why it might be a good idea for a middle-aged, mediocre yet enthusiastic athlete to give it a try. I didn’t even mention animals! Animals innately fast when they’re sick or need healing.

The thing is: I’ve never been a “good” faster. I don’t play nice when the comfort of food is taken away even if I did make the choice to do the damn thing. During the few attempts I’ve made to do traditional fasts, I experienced so many internal (and some outward) tantrums that I ended up soothing my frustration by shoving a loaf of bread down my gullet. Not quite healing, emotionally or nutritionally. 

I’m also not a big fan of talking about fasts — unless it’s within a spiritual or scientific context. The toxicity of Diet Culture permeates so deeply that I’m always utterly bummed to hear how many women (I know men fall into these traps, too) use fasts and cleanses to self-validate the thought that something is wrong with them; that their weight isn’t good enough, that they have to “reset,” that their “failures” in nutrition somehow require the punishment of severe calorie restriction and that this failure ultimately defines them as people despite having amazing characters, despite all the good they do in their lives, despite looking good though so many are convinced they do not. Typically, I won’t talk about fasts or diet fads of any kind. I reject the general sweep of “wrongness” and the shame we can’t seem to shake as a culture about our bodies and food. 

So, this post is a razor’s edge for me. I am wildly interested in the science of longevity and healing by way of holistic sources, and ya can’t get around that without talking about topics like food and experimenting with nutrition — and in this case: the restriction of food. If this is too triggering of a subject for you, honestly don’t read further. Know that you are perfect whatever you ate over the weekend and how you look in a bathing suit and how you performed or didn’t perform in the Open. 

If the topic is not triggering, you are perfect, too, and read on.

I’m coming off the fifth and final day of a “Longevity Fast.” It was really “fast mimicking” as it was not no-calorie or juice based. I’d been researching the science behind longevity including cell rejuvenation and proactive disease prevention and came across Dr. Valter Longo, a professor of longevity at USC. Dr. Longo has capitalized on his research by assertively selling ProLon, a five-day “fast mimicking” kit for the high price of $250.  

Though the price and the marketing of ProLon are a bit off-putting to me, I am completely compelled by the science behind fast mimicking. The idea is to eat between 800-1,000 calories a day for five days. The food is highly nutrient-dense with a specific macro content. A ProLon pack includes freeze-dried soups and bars parceled out exactly as needed each day. In Ted Talks and his books, Dr. Longo dives deeply into the science in great detail; an ability I’m not exactly qualified to relay — unless it’s pure regurgitation — but, what I do understand is that many studies of fast mimicking show lower disease markers, better cognitive function, and impressive cellular repair from periodic calorie restriction without having to be too extreme like with a water fast. What I intuitively know is that the body, when given a good opportunity, has an ability to heal itself and regenerate in many ways, which in turn, hopefully, retains a high quality of life for a long time.

The older I get and as I witness relatively young family members suffer serious health issues, healing and regenerating have moved up the latter of my well-being priorities. 

I did not order ProLon. I mimicked the fast mimicking. I mainly wanted to save money. And though the ProLon food is made with whole foods, I wanted fresh food — and less packaging. In the mornings, I made a super-food green shake. Lunch and dinner were highlighted by a vegan mineral broth made with magical mushrooms and seaweed. Snack was another super shake made with fresh young coconut, cacao, and maca. I also had a cup of quinoa with the broth for dinner and I usually had half an apple after that. Not super hard, not super easy. Not full meals, not quite a full-on fast. Five days of this seemed doable for the coveted benefits of cell rejuvenation, possibly lower disease markers, and a vitality boost. Would the wheels come off as I still had to work full time at an energetically demanding job? Could I keep it together for the two workouts I planned to do while filling the other days with yoga? Would a loaf of bread be my pacifier mid-way through?

The wheels did not come off though it took FOCUS. There was juuuust enough food to ward off tantrums, and when I started to feel a rise of anger because of the emotional attachment I unapologetically have to food, I simply said to myself, “I am honored and privileged to do this fast.” Every time I said this — and I said it a lot — I calmed down because honestly, it is an honor to be able to experiment with my optimal well being when family members are lost in a minutiae of information, or they use the “shoulds” surrounding nutrition and beauty standards as ammunition again themselves. I feel privileged to be able to have intuition about my health without feeling that my looks and weight are the end all, be all.  Lastly, I have the honor and privilege of optimal food choices when so many do not have access to enough fresh, nutritious food.

The nitty gritty: All in all, it wasn’t terrible, and I actually feel good! I wasn’t really hungry though I missed food and the celebration that is eating. I didn’t suffer from any headaches, tantrums, or major detox symptoms, but I don’t drink caffeine so I know that eased me into this. Day 1 and 2 were the easiest though I hear for some those are the hardest. Day 3 was the hardest. Day 3 was like when you’re in round 3 of a workout like Eva and you’re so sad that there are 2 more rounds to go. That’s what it felt like, but waaay longer. I ended up doing three workouts instead of two just because I felt up for it, and they weren’t easy workouts. I was worried how I would feel during, but I didn’t feel any worse than I normally would during challenging workouts. My days were busy, filled to the brim with clients and coaching classes and family life, and I really had to manage my crankiness at the end of Day 3. But with breathing and a couple “you’re ok’s” and “don’t take it out on this person” and “I’m f*cking honored and privileged to do this gd fast…” I was good, solid. In fact, no one really knew I was doing this. 

Did my cells rejuvenate? HOW WOULD I KNOW. I hope so as I’m going to trust the science. I do feel less inflammation as I had been feeling sluggish lately on my runs prior to doing this, and now I feel better. My skin looks a bit better,  — but maybe because I’ve been drinking SO MUCH WATER — and I do feel a little sharper mentally. This experiment was also a big reminder of how much better I feel eating mainly nutrient-packed, fresh food. Apparently, I can’t get enough reminders of that. 

Fast Mimicking is not meant to be sustained for long periods; five days total. In fact, a good, nutritious refeed is part of the protocol for the regeneration process. When starting out, it’s advised to do this five days every month for three months straight and then take it down to once a quarter. Honestly, I think I can do that for less fog, less inflammation, a little more clarity, and the rejuvenation that, by faith, I believe is happening somewhere inside of me. 


Friday’s Workout
Practice Day

A) QAMRAP 8:
8 Bulgarian Split Squat (each leg)
8 Single-arm DB Push Press (each arm)

B) Breath Gear Pyramid EMOM
Ski Erg
DB Thrusters

C) “Choo-Cha”
FQT:
15-10-5
Ski Erg cals
DB Thrusters
(5-minute cap)

Also on Friday at 12:00-12:30pm ….

Breath Class with Tanya!

Saturday’s Workout

19.3 CF Open 

For time:
200-ft. dumbbell overhead lunge
50 dumbbell box step-ups
50 strict handstand push-ups
200-ft. handstand walk

50-lb. dumbbell, 24-in. box 
Time cap: 10 minutes

We’ll talk scaling options!

Sunday’s Workout

Partner AMRAP 20
Partner 1:
Run 200m

Partner 2:
6 Knee to Elbow
7 Burpees
8 RKBS (32/24)
9 Squats

And at 11:15am …

Breathe with Tanya!

 

I was listening to The Knowledge Project podcast this morning and the guest on the show was Howard Marks, the billionaire investor and co-founder of Oaktree Capital. He was describing the culture at his company and the mindset that they have cultivated, to which Mr. Marks attributes much of their success. Speaking about his relationship with his business partner of 20+ years, he said, “We are unusually supportive of each other. . . Neither of us has ever said to the other one,  ‘Boy that worked out badly. You did a stupid thing.’ This is not an activity where you can bat a thousand. . . If you have an organization which second-guesses your mistakes, you create an organization that is mistake averse. . .[Instead,] we have cultivated the ability to distinguish between bad decisions and bad outcomes.”  He explained that you cannot really blueprint a step-by-step recipe for this sort of supportive relationship, but you can cultivate a mindset that recognizes the inherent uncertainty in the world (or financial markets) and doesn’t confuse bad outcomes with bad decisions: “Improbable things happen all the time and probable things fail to happen all the time, because the world is an uncertain place. We are going to make decisions that don’t work. . . In the short run, a good decision that didn’t work can look a lot like a bad decision. But we have a mentality that recognizes that and doesn’t criticize people when good decisions don’t work out.”

 

My hope is that we are cultivating a similar mindset here – that people aren’t afraid to make mistakes (provided that we are learning from them), and that we as coaches and athletes can learn to distinguish between bad outcomes and bad decisions – and that our enjoyment of the training experience isn’t overly connected to the outcomes (given the uncertainty of the world) but is strongly connected to the good decisions made in the process.

____________

THURSDAY

COMPETITION

“16.1 – ish”

AMRAP 20:

OH Plate Walking Lunges (45/25)

10 Burpees to a Plate

OH Plate Walking Lunges

10 Pull Ups

 

FRIDAY

PRACTICE

A) QAMRAP 8:

     8 Bulgarian Split Squats (each leg)

     8 Single-arm DB Push Press (each arm)

B) EMOM 8:

     Odds: Ski Erg cals

     Even: DB Thrusters

     (Breath Gear Priority)

C) “Choo-Cha”

     FQT:

     15-10-5 reps of:

     Ski Erg cals

     DB Thrusters (50/35)

    (5-minute cap)

How do we find our limits in regards to our work and movement capacity? We’ve got to push around and up against them and feel them out, rep after rep after rep. Meaning, you’ve gotta put the time in while paying attention. The more the experience (while paying attention), the easier it gets to understand where you are.  I want to encourage you to be curious, to play and see where you are, to know where you want or need to push or back off (yes, a back off is ok too).

When pushing the upper limits I believe this truly should be done slowly- like your trying to parallel park in a small spot that you “might” fit in, this parking job doesn’t happen fast, you go slow and careful. This is what practice days are for.  Class after class gradually pushing the depth of your squat slowly.  Not jumping up on the rings to do a muscle up if you don’t have a pull up or dip. SLOW!  This doesn’t mean practice days are to be done slowly, it just means visiting the end ranges happens with care. 

Let’s talk about weights. So, let’s say you know you can move 95 pounds at most every workout with a bb clean and haven’t tried something different. Well, what if you slowly progressed the weight up to see where your upper limit is? (like when your movement breaks down). Now, there are things to consider when increasing weights over time. How many reps are you doing? Have you handled 30 reps at 95#? How about 50 reps? Does your movement look the same as it did at rep one? Maybe the workout of the day requires only 15 reps, could you be curious to see if you could handle more weight and still keep quality movement, while getting the stimulus that is asked of the workout?

Gymnastics: Let’s say you’ve tried a handstand push up before, but failed after a few. Are you missing the strength to hold the shape that is needed for the movement? Do you have enough ROM to find the start and end position? After looking at those things we can see where work  might be needed and where you can push. Again, this might call for progressing slowly form push ups to down dog push ups to hs negatives to hspu.(or another progression)  You can explore your boundaries of OH pushing strength while also playing with where you OH ROM is. This is working both work and movement capacity.

I want you to be curious, to be inspired to try something new and play with it. And remember, it’s supposed to be fun.  


Wednesday’s Workout
Practice

A) 6 RFQ 6 Dball lap to up over bar
4-6 Candlestick levers

B) Box Squat 10 x 2 @ 70% + 20lbs

 

Thursday’s Workout
Competition

“16.1 – ish”
AMRAP 20
OH Plate Walking Lunges (45/25)
10 Burpees to a Plate
OH Plate Walking Lunges
10 Pull Ups

Hi All – 

If you remember back to my blog post for the end of 2018, I wrote down a couple goals that I wanted all of us to achieve. One of those, was read a new book; a goal that I have taken with me into 2019.

 

My current book of choice is “Make Your Bed” by Admiral William H. McRaven. I highly recommend this book- it is a quick read, insightful and motivating (without being cheesy). One part that really resonated with me was the below quote. More often than not, we often see our struggles as greater than someone else’s. We blame people for our failures. 

Chapter 4 – Life’s Not Fair – Drive On!

“It is easy to blame your lot in life on some outside force, to stop trying because you believe fate is against you. It is easy to think that where you were raised, how your parents treated you, or what school you went to is all that determines your future. Nothing could be further from the truth. The common people and the great men and women are all defined by how they deal with life’s unfairness: Helen Keller, Nelson Mandela, Stephen Hawking, Malala Yousafzai…”

This quote goes to show that pointing the finger does nothing, and it is up to us to create our own successes. One simple task, of “making your bed”, can lead you on the track of completing more and more goals and achievements. One tasks turns into two, two turns into a whole weeks worth of goals/task that you have achieved.


Tuesday – Practice

A) AMRAP 2
Stict Pull Ups
1 Minute Rest
AMRAP 3
L – Sit
1 Minute Rest
AMRAP 4
Bar Hang
Score = Total Reps

B) For Time (8 Minute Cap):
30 – 20 – 10
Power Snatch (95/65)
Calorie Row

Wednesday – Practice

A) 6 RFQ
6 D-BALL Lap To Up Over Bar
4-6 Candlestick levers

B) Box Squat
10 x 2 @ 70% + 20lbs