Think back to when you were in college or growing up and going to school. You would often have one last final exam before you could enjoy weeks off for summer break.

 

Your teachers would probably emphasize that coming to every class would be crucial to passing this exam. That the answers would be provided in lecture. That the occasional extra work would be very helpful, to retaining the information. Or, that they would even be willing to offer extra office hours, so you could be successful. All key ingredients that would almost guarantee you success on that final exam. We all know this; and we all knew that ones who showed up and put forth the effort, would often pass. Well the same goes for our gym.

 

You cannot expect to show up once or twice a week, and max out your lifts. You cannot expect to never try one of running or cardio classes and get a sub 7 minute mile. Just like showing up in school and putting in the effort in and outside of classroom, the same goes to towards our class.

 

We like your former teachers, are here, willing to give you those extra tips. Willing to provide those 1:1 sessions (aka office hours). Or anything that you may need. But, it’s going to require a lot of work from you.

 

You cannot only show up on the days, that you deem to be a “good workout”. Show up on the days that challenge you, that bring out your weaknesses, that prioritize nasal breathing, and so on. All of these things matter. And I promise, if you show up, work hard, ask for help –you’ll get what you’re looking for. 

 


 

Tuesday – Practice 

A) Power Cleans: 5 Rounds on the 2:00
2 @ 60%
2 @ 65%
2 @ 70%
2×2 @ 75%

B) 3 RFQ:
40 lateral Hops
16 Alt Pistols
100m DBall FR Carry
Flex Arm Hold

Wednesday – Competition

“DA DIZ” 10 Rounds
2 min to complete: 
250m Row
10 Burpees to a Target
-60 Second Rest-

 

 

 

 

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Monday’s Workout
Mental Toughness
“Keep it 200”
     AMRAP 18:
     Row EXACTLY 200m
     15 Push-ups
     Run 400m

Tuesday’s Workout
Practice
A) Power Cleans:
     5 Rounds on the 2:00
     2 @ 60%
     2 @ 65%
     2 @ 70%
     2 @ 75%
     2 @ 75%

B) 3 RFQ
     40 lateral Hops
     16 Alt Pistols
     100m Dball FR carry
     Flex arm hold

 

 

 

Breath Class on Sunday will also include an intro to Exposure!

We are doing Breath + Ice + Sauna on Sunday.

Breath 11:15-12:15 followed immediately by recovery with an introduction to cold water immersion and sauna. Please bring a 20lb. bag of ice and a swimsuit if you want to participate. All are welcome (except that ice+heat is not recommended if you are pregnant).


Friday’s Workout
Practice

“Franklin Light Hunt”
AMLAP 8min
2 Rounds on the 10
Across Down Back Up Back Across —-then—- Max Light Posts Score 

Saturday’s Workout

AMRAP 10
15 Wall Balls (20/14)
10 Hang Power Cleans (135/95)
AND THEN…NO REST AT ALL…IMMEDIATELY INTO…
AMRAP 4
ME Cal Row

Sunday’s Workout

“Lil Jonesy”
For time:
40-30-20-10
DB Snatch
50-100-150-200
DUs

Folks! Coach Shirley will be leading a free yoga class on Friday night at 7:45pm. Bring your yoga mat and a friend and start the weekend feeling flexy and bendy. If you want a double-dose of free on Friday, come at noon for a free 1/2-hour performance breath class with Coach Matt.

_____________________

THURSDAY’S WORKOUT

PRACTICE

A) 5 Rounds on the 3:00

     :20 Low Plank

     2 Hang Power Cleans + 1 Squat Clean (~70%)

B) For Quality:

     4-8-12-16 reps of:

     Strict Pull-ups

     Front Squats (115/95)

     ***200m Run on the 3:00***

FRIDAY’S WORKOUT

COMPETITION

“Franklin Hill Light Hunt”

 

When the coach say’s “We have a Competition Workout today”…what does “your” mindset say?  

Contextual coaching has been apart of my training for over 40 years.  I can remember my first CrossCountry 5k competition at age 16…like it was 40 years ago! 
My coach looked into my eyes and said: “…are you ready to run your best today?” I distinctly recall not even know what to say, other than….”I guess so?” 🙁

At the gym, for a lot of us, competition days are not always aligned with our life circumstances.  And sometimes we just show up to burn off the day’s demons…I get that!  To this point, I’d like to offer up the idea of creating “sub” contexts to Competition Days.  

For example, this Wednesday’s is “Helen”, a classic CrossFit  competition workout:

  • Game it…play with the variables: Speed & Power….
    This workout is for time!  The mean time for Helen is approx. 10-12mins.  If you are a Runner (cardio bunny) and possess less powerful…Run with vigor and scale the KB weight and possibly the PU’s. 
  • Is time just a construct?  How about, movement and breath capacity as your priority?
    Can you maintain a strict focus on run form and not falter on your breath Gear of choice?  Can your KBS’s and PU’s follow suit? When I know that going for “time” in not going to motivate me, I can always find an inner competition with my ability to move at the speed of mindful efficiency! 

WEDNESDAY – COMPETITION

“Helen”
3RFT
400m Run
21 KBS (24/16)
12 Pull Ups


THURSDAY – PRACTICE

A) 5 Rounds on the 3:00 :20
Low Plank 2 Hang Power Cleans + 1 Squat Clean (~70%)

B) For Quality: 4-8-12-16 reps of:
Strict Pull-ups Front Squats (115/95)
***200m Run on the 3:00***


 

It’s easy to get lost in the weeds about this diet or that diet, macro nutrient, and/or calorie counting. Hence, I always appreciate big picture guidance that underscores principles, as opposed to methods. Here is a version of nutrition principles that is included as a part of Performance Psychologist Michael Gervais’ and Seattle Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll’s Finding Your Best online course: 

 
Eat colorful foods:  
• Eating whole foods in a variety of colors gives us the best chance to obtain balanced nutrition.  
• Aim for 5 different colors on your plate at each of your major meals.
Consume lean protein:
• Protein is essential as it helps build muscle mass, which enhances our metabolism.
• Examples of lean protein include but are not limited to grass fed beef, chicken, wild caught fish, edamame, chickpeas and eggs.
Enjoy healthy fats:
• Healthy fats, in particular those which contain Omega 3’s and monounsaturated fat, are foundational for brain and heart functioning. They also help us stay satiated longer, as they take longer to digest, especially when combined with lean protein and low-glycemic foods such as non-starchy vegetables and beans.
• Healthy fats can be found in certain oils, such as olive and coconut oil, fish such as tuna and salmon, avocados, nuts (e.g.: almonds and walnuts) and seeds like flaxseed and chia.
Other helpful behaviors:
• Start your day with a large glass of water.  
• Watch less TV. The sights, memories, emotions and thoughts that are provoked while watching TV or being exposed to commercials can signal our brain and influence how much and what we want to eat.
• Stop counting calories. Eat more of the right foods.  
• Be mindful of how your body responds to the food and liquid you consume. Practice a short mindfulness body-scan meditation to tune into signals of hunger and fullness.
• Slow down your eating. It takes 20 minutes for the brain to compute satiety.
• Cut back on added sugar and refined/processed carbohydrates such as those found in anything packaged, e.g., cereal, chips, breads, pasta, cookies, soda, etc. 
• It’s natural for you to have cravings. Here’s a good mindful strategy for dealing with them: Pause and notice them, think about where they are coming from, choose how you want to respond.
• Have a plan when eating out. Here are a few suggestions: 1) share a meal, 2) have the server box up half of the meal and bring it at the end to take home, 3) order two small appetizers instead one large meal, giving yourself an option for some lean protein and colorful vegetables, 4) when eating salad look for something with lean protein, nutritious add-ons such as mushrooms or artichokes that are high in fiber, and plain (not candied) nuts. Opt-in to whole fat salad dressing. Studies have found that we absorb more nutrients from vegetables and fruits when paired with fat.
• Change your language around food. Rather than the deprivation mindset e.g. “I can’t eat that…” try, “I don’t eat that…” Research has found this feels more in alignment with self-control.

Tuesday
Practice
A) Back Squat – Find a Heavy 3
B) 3 RFQ
    15/12 CAL AB
    50 Double Unders
    50 Air Squats
Wednesday
Competition
“Helen”
3RFT
400m Run
21 KBS (24/16)
12 Pull Ups

Every Monday through July I’ll share additional perspective about the decision to remove the business specifically from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube. Collectively these mediums capture over two hours a day per person. Unfortunately ALL humans have limited time per day to pay attention in general (roughly 3-4 hrs/day).  When we pay two hours of attention to platforms that, by design, reward impulsivity, we become less intentional. The net effect amplifies negative emotions. None of this is what we are trying to do here at Oak Park. To this end I wrote a letter to our team about a month ago after nine months of researching all of this deeply. Hopefully this adds insight and deepens the conversation for all of us.

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Going Dark on Socials Pt. 2 from Kenny Kane on Vimeo.

The Attention Economy Crash – How Social Media Undermines Fitness, Health, and Wellness (Antisocial Media Part 1) 
“In the attention economy, winning means getting as many people as possible to spend as much time and attention as possible with one’s product or service. Although, as it’s often said, in the attention economy, the user is the product.”
  • James Williams, Stand Out of Our Light 
The following is a letter to the coaching team at Oak Park and any other coach willing to take on a big issue with meaningful action. 
We are coaches, so our duty is to lead people to fitness, health, and wellness. We do this with high touch, human-to-human coaching. Along the path, we support the sustainable growth of our athletes and clients. This is hard and requires effort on both sides to do the work of growing.  Intentional, sustainable growth takes time, attention, intentionality, free will, self-regulation, self-reflection, purpose, human connection and positive emotions. As the longer version of this article shows, ALL of these essential resources are depleted and often negated completely and thus, when we post to Facebook, IG, Twitter, and YouTube with the dual purpose of “building our brands,” and “helping” those we lead, we’re simultaneously hurting the people we care about. 
This is very hard to see in real time and reconcile with the ongoing narrative that I hear often: “You gotta meet people where they are. Posting is just a necessary evil and simply part of business. When I post it’s different and therefore not hurtful by intent…” Clearly, no coach is trying to harm anybody using these platforms. HOWEVER, our intent and the collective outcome are very different things. We are leaders and we need to challenge these assumptions and crosscheck our actions. 
With this in mind, I ask for patience as you familiarize yourself with the key points below, then take a deeper dive into the longer research article to fully understand the consequences of our participation on these platforms.

Time
1/3 of humans are spending two plus hours daily on these platforms. As you read, these numbers grow. Generally speaking, if you could help your athletes reclaim two hours a day where might it come from? Family, work, study, training, life goals, sleep…or social media? By design, social platforms are in direct competition with each of these critical areas of life by diverting real time that could be better spent elsewhere. 

Attention
Unfortunately, information abundance creates attention scarcity. This cannot be understated. As Daniel Pink shares in his book When, the human brain can only focus deeply for a few hours a day. Humane technology advocate Tristan Harris points out that these technologies are designed to increase your arousal state so you pay attention. Silicon Valley attributes value to attention by adding time spent on a platform to “engagement” (likes, comments, shares, etc.). By design they feel urgent, that if you’re not part of it, you’re missing out. This returns us to the math problem we’re reckoning with: a couple of hours a day of feeling urgency and constantly getting metaphorically picked for a kickball team (or not) continually and deliberately pricks your sympathetic nervous system. In the moment, this satisfies the urgency and the deep anthropological, primatological, and sociological desire to group with others, which is a powerful combination to capture any human’s attention. But in doing so, it subtracts from the limited amount of focus we have to attribute each day, and keeps us in a stress state. As a coach, I know that our clients have a finite number of possible focus points per day. And if someone is checking social media dozens of times a day, they’re quickly spending much of this attentional currency, to the detriment of the health and wellbeing.  

Impulsivity at the expense of Intentionality
Once a social platform has your attention, it goes to work using a reward system that literally trains impulsivity at the expense of intentionality using behavioral psychology (think Pavlov’s dogs). These technologies and our interactions stay in the base of the brain stem by design. Tons of information comes in, all of it seeming and feeling urgent. The hippocampus can’t do its job and create context for what it’s seeing, and the prefrontal cortex can’t reflect and make solid choices congruent with one’s deeper purpose. In the process, the cost is significant: loss of free will, loss of self-regulation, and loss of self-reflection. EVERY time we interact with these “tools,” we reinforce our impulsiveness, while undermining our capacity for deliberate decision-making. Sound like a long game for any human?
As a coach, this may be the most important point here. Generally speaking, if we are habituating information overload in a decontextualized way, we are depleting our brain’s resources to do something meaningful that requires attention – like learn a new physical skill. If you’re a coach who teaches movement of any kind, I’d like to think that this is an important consideration. I’m not saying there is clinical evidence (yet) that people can’t learn new skills if they are on socials.

That said, we do know from the work of neuroscientists like Amy Brann that it can take 45 minutes or longer to come down from emotionally up-regulated negative emotions and transition into more of a learning state. If people are checking their phones 150 times a dayand let’s say conservatively they are looking at socials 10 times, then the odds are they may not be in the headspace to take on the thing you want to teach. Most of us have enough natural stress in life just being human – let alone being triggered by these technologies. 

And while human impulsivity is literally being capitalized, it is also becoming routinized. The solution to helping others certainly does not lie here.  
4. Negative Emotions

At our core, all humans have a deep biological need to connect socially. To date, this is how we’ve survived as a species. Interestingly, we have natural limits in our capacity to maintain human relationships.  Robin Dunbar, an evolutionary psychologist at the University of Oxford, has clearly demonstrated that the human brain can only sustain meaningful contact with a maximum of 150 people. 

The role of most companies is to scale. Scaling the manufacturing of tires is one thing, extracting our humanity daily and scaling it is another. These technologies exploit our deepest need to connect as humans and scale them. What happens when you are drilled for posts, likes, comments, and followers?  You give your time and attention to the maintenance and expansion of these things. The more this happens, the more likely impulsivity is to kick in. And this is where the human extraction project really gets going. Survival instincts kick in, impulsivity fertilizes fear, negativity, and loss of empathy (Lanier, Williams, humanetech.org). The plants that grow from this look like outrage, catastrophe, and anger.

If our business is truly based on human relationships and genuine connections with those we serve, then we must consider what mediums we use. Technology is not the enemy here. Tech that extracts the resources that support human growth is. Nobody reading this is intentionally hurting anyone, but these platforms are and worse still, they’re monetizing this. 
What do I suggest we do? 
1. Turn off the socials
2. Double down on the human part of the business 
3. Tell our stories on technologies and platforms congruent with our intention of supporting intentional, sustainable growth. 
4. Grow referral capacity until we hit our ceiling
5. Show the industry that humans are the center, not tech that depletes them

Monday’s Workout
Practice

A) Bulgarian Banana Split Squats
6x :30 :30 (3 per side)

B) Hingers & Hipsters
3x Supersets

C) AMRAP 8
6 (per arm) Single Arm Floor Press
16 (alt) Dynamic Lunge Jumps

Tuesday’s Workout
Practice
A) Back Squat – Find a Heavy 3

B) 3 RFQ
15/12 CAL AB
50 Double Unders
50 Air Squat

How’s summer going, guys? Fun? Full of travel? And family? Too hot? Whatever’s going on, I hope you’re enjoying it.

Don’t forget Coach Hackleman will be here teaching Saturday’s 10am class!


Friday’s Workout
Practice

A) ABS! TIGHT!
B) Monkeying Around
C) For Quality:
400m Run
then
3 Rounds of:
12 Ring/Inverted Rows
20 See Saw DB Thrusters
then
800m Run

Saturday’s Workout
4x
:30:30

Mini BB rollout
Mid Range Chair Sit
Hanging Chair Sit (alt grip)

4x
6-8 Bottom Up Press
6-8 Single Leg RDL Row

15 min AMRAP

20 (10 & 10) Step Up/Step Through
10 Split Stance DB Clean
400m Row

Sunday’s Workout
4RFT:
Member Choice:
Assault Bike (35/25 CAL)
Row (500m)
Run (400m)

You may switch round to round.

20 Deadlifts (185/135)
20 Burpee Box Jumps (24/20)

Monday’s Workout
Practice

A) Bulgarian Banana Split Squats
6x :30 :30 (3 per side)

B) Hingers & Hipsters
3x Supersets

C) AMRAP 8
6 (per arm) Single Arm Floor Press
16 (alt) Dynamic Lunge Jumps

Saturday presents an interesting opportunity for the adventurous soul – a trifecta of fitness. Were one daring, one could take CrossFit class with Coach Jared at 9am, stay for John Hackleman’s martial arts fitness class at 10am, and finish off with bodybuilding with Coach Nick at 11am. Not for the faint of heart, but not a bad way to spend a Saturday!

________________________

THURSDAY’S WORKOUT

COMPETITION

Mins. 0-2

AMRAP 2:

60/40 Cal Ski

Mins. 2-6

AMRAP 4:

20 Wall Balls (20/14)

20 DB Snatch (50/35)

Mins. 6-12

AMRAP 6:

10 C&J (135/95)

10 Lateral Burpee Over Bar

Mins. 12-20

AMRAP 8:

400m Run

60/40 Cal Row

200 Double Unders

Score = Total Reps

FRIDAY’S WORKOUT

PRACTICE

A) ABS! TIGHT!

B) Monkeying Around

C) For Quality:

     400m Run

     — then

     3 Rounds of:

     12 Ring Rows/Inverted Rows

     20 See Saw DB Thrusters

     — then 800m Run

This past weekend we had the pleasure of having Patrick Mckeown – the author of The Oxygen Advantage with us all day Saturday. His book shares that nose breathing will bring us better health. He mostly talks about all the hours we aren’t at the gym, which are the majority of the hours. His tag line – breathe light to breathe right.  At Oak Park we have been incorporating breathing exercises and protocols for a while now which is awesome and can be challenging. As a kid who had exercise induced asthma growing up, not being able to breathe was the main reason that moving wasn’t fun sometimes. (that’s how weightlifting began for me) Anyway, if we can control our breath we can control our mind.  

When we breathe through our nose we improve diagphram movement, we also improve our functional movements (that’s what we work on) and reduce the risk of back injury. Our diaphragm is connected to our ribs and spine and when we engage it through use it assists in spinal stability. 

When we breath through our nose (be it at rest or during exercise) Nitric Oxide is released. This is a vasodilator which allows blood to flow smoothly and carry oxygen that our muscles need to fuel our body for moment and life. 

Patrick shared a few great exercises to assist in nasal breathing for better health. 

The below warm up exercise can be done seated and helps bring attention to nasal breathing.

You will start with normal breathing, then after a small exhale pinch you nose and hold for 2-5 seconds. Next breathe normally for 10-15 seconds and repeat again. This should take about 2.5min. You should not feel stressed during this. If you feel stressed hold your breath for shorter duration. If your air hunger becomes too much, decrease breath hold time. 

And if you haven’t yet taped your mouth shut at night with some paper tape to ensure nasal breathing while sleeping, give it a try. The first time I tried it I woke up feel the most refreshed Id ever felt. 


Wednesday’s Workout
Practice

A) 3 Rounds :30
See Saw DB Bench Press (45/30)
Hypoxic DB Carry for distance

B) 2 Rounds AMRCAP 2
(As many rope climbs as possible in 2 min) 2 min rest

C) Power Clean – Strength
A1) Power Cleans
2 reps @ 60%
2 reps @ 70%
2×2 reps @ 75%
2×2 reps @ 80%
3×3 Clean Pulls @ 100%

 

Thursday’s Workout
Competition

Min. 0-2
AMRAP 2
60/40 Cal Ski*

Min. 2-6
AMRAP 4
20 Wall Balls (20/14)
20 DB Snatch (50/35)

Min. 6-12
AMRAP 6
10 C&J (135/95)
10 Lateral Burpee Over Bar (24/20)

Min. 12-20
AMRAP 8
400m Run
60/40 Cal Row
200 Double Unders

Total Score = Total Reps