There isn’t one. 

Example #1 : Billy Bob is training for a marathon in June and then plans to train for a powerlifting meet in December. Now imagine the change in his diet- and all the adjustments he could possibly make.  Without going into great detail about the various ways this could be done. Just know that nutrition can help you optimize your performance. It’s wise to pay attention to something that can help you achieve your goals. 

Example #2: Sara is going to Hawaii in 2 months and wants to have a “six pack in her bikini”? Does she really want that?  The better question would be, what would she be willing to give up for those 8 weeks, to potential get those abs. 

Although a key component, nutrition is just one piece to the puzzle that is known as RECOVERY. You can only TRAIN as hard as you RECOVER!  If you’re not up on your sleep, nutrition, & mobility-  you won’t be at your best. The reality is, life, work, family obligations are all things that can pull time away from proper recovery. It happens, don’t beat yourself up, but do be honest with yourself. We just have to do our best to create healthy behaviors that keep us in the game for the long haul. 

Humans are diverse. We need to know our “WHY.” Reach out to your coach. Have a conversation. We are not just here to point to the whiteboard and turn the clock on. If you think that, you are terribly mistaken.  

So much on my mind, I’ll stop here. If you’d like to dive deeper, you can find me lifting something heavy and then putting it back down over and over again! #barbells4life  

 

 

Tuesday – Competition

“Down to Clown”
10 Rounds for Reps (5 rounds each partner, alternating) :90:15
P1: In a weighted Plank (45/25)
P2: Goes through stations any way they choose as long as they hit all stations before repeating.
Stations:
10 Box Jumps (24/20)
10 Cals on Clown Bike
10 (each side) SA RKBS (20/16)
10 (each side) See Saw Press (40/25)
10 2×4 High Wire Split Squats


Wednesday – Practice

A) Box Squat

B) 6 RFQ
15 SA KB Thrusters (24/16)
5 KB Windmills
5 Bar Muscle Ups

 

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Monday’s Workout
Practice

A) Conditioning and Mobility
     Row 60cal (Gear 3) (4 min cap)
          4 min mob intermission
     Row 60 cal (Gear 4) (4 min cap)
          4 min snatch prep
     Row 60 cal (Gear 5) (4 min cap)
          4 min prep for B

B) 10 min QAMRAP
Snatch Complex + Pull-ups Chin-ups
     High Hang Squat Snatch
     Hang Squat Snatch
     Low Hang Squat Snatch
     Below the Knee Squat Snatch
     Squat Snatch
*Max Strict pullu-ps/Chin-ups

Tuesday’s Workout
Competition
“Down to Clown”
10 Rounds for Reps (5 rounds each partner, alternating) :90:15
     P1: In a weighted Plank (45/25)
     P2: Goes through stations any way they choose as long as they hit all stations before     repeating.
Stations:
     10 Box Jumps (24/20)
     10 Cals on Clown Bike
     10 (each side) SA RKBS (20/16)
     10 (each side) See Saw Press (40/25)
     10 2×4 High Wire Split Squats


A few people have asked recently in class whether they should be rowing differently when they are rowing for calories instead of rowing for meters. The answer I have given is, “No.” And here is why:

 

Whether you read the kilogram side of your kettlebell or the pounds, that hunk of metal weighs the same when you swing it. When you’re driving a car in France, the car isn’t going faster because it reads kilometers instead of miles. Similarly, what is displayed on the monitor of your rower is just a unit of measurement.

 

What changes on the erg when you press a button on the monitor to switch from meters to calories? Nothing. Meters and calories are just measures of the work you’re doing. One is a measure of power expressed as a distance (meters), the other is a measure of power expressed as energy output (calories).

 

You don’t power clean differently when you’re loading the barbell with kilo plates and you don’t drive differently just because the car is reading kilometers. The work is the work, the power output is the power output, and efficiency will be rewarded regardless of how you measure the work. Keep this in mind as you row: You don’t need to pull harder or set the damper higher just because you’re rowing for calories. You need to remain efficient and focus on proper mechanics.

_______________________

THURSDAY’S WORKOUT

PRACTICE

A1) EMOM 10: 1-5 Strict Chest-to-Bar Pull-ups

A2) EMOM 10: 5 Tempo Goblet Squats (321x tempo)

A3) Ski Erg for max distance in 10 minutes

 

FRIDAY’S WORKOUT

PRACTICE

A) Box Squats

    10 x 2 @ 70% + 30lbs

B) 50-40-30-20-10 reps of

     Double Unders

     Chair Sit (seconds)

     (12-minute cap)

I first published this blog article on November 5, 2018. 

Why the repost? Well, for many of you, this is probably the first time you are seeing this. And, for those of you about to give this another read, GOOD ON YA because the only form of learning is RE-LEARNING!!! 


SxB=R is a very practical formula I refer to as a way to help myself and others align behaviors with desired outcome (s) (result). Moreover, this formula takes into account how a desired outcome is influenced by context (situation). 

Let’s consider this formula as it pertains to our programming (practice, competition, and mental toughness days) at Oak Park. 

Situation Behavior Result
Practice Pace: Slow/systematic; Priority: Task, process, goal oriented LEARN
Competition Pace: Fast/spontaneous; Priority: Outcome, ego oriented TEST
Mental Toughness Pace: Depends on student
Priority: Goal oriented specific to the challenge
CHALLENGE

Notice that the primary desired outcome for each of the contexts is different. This does NOT imply that practice days can’t be challenging nor does it imply that you cannot learn something valuable on a competition day. The point is that in order for you to get the most out of the context, you have to understand the main purpose of the context, i.e., the WHY.

  • Why do we practice? We practice, so that we can learn. The learning is often specific to the contents of that day and specific to the growth needs of the student.
  • Why do we compete? We compete, so that we can test our abilities and capacities against others and/or against a previous version of ourselves. While the gray area of process is important, so is the black/white of measuring one’s ability very specifically with hard numerics, e.g., how much weight did you lift versus how did the technique of that lift look (more valuable question on a practice day).
  • It can be more difficult for people to understand the difference between a mental toughness day and a competition day. Therefore, I find this definition helpful: Mental toughness is about purposefully digging yourself into a hole to see how well you can get out of it. Pragmatically, on a competition day, it would not make any sense to dig yourself into a hole because you are trying to “win”. This nuance is important because it helps to understand why we program mental toughness days the way we do, AND how you can get more out of mental toughness days by being more deliberate about how you choose to behave in the workout that is most aligned with challenging yourself.

The context of a workout refers to WHAT, the associative, desired outcome refers to WHY, and the behaviors are HOW you go about achieving that desired outcome.

There are an infinite number of behaviors that can be considered, especially when taking into account the infinite ways a workout can be designed. What I have done in the chart above is give you two main filters of behavior (priority and pace). Again, just like how practice days aren’t only intended for you to learn something, the priority and pace listed for practice, competition, and mental toughness days are NOT ALWAYS appropriate given the workout but, for the most part, they are the behaviors best in service of honoring the primary desired outcome–learn, test, or challenge.

When the desired outcome is learning, it is most fitting to prioritize the task and process specific to the goal of that practice day, and, often, the best way to do that is for your pace of movement to be slower and more systematic. 

Whereas, when it comes time to testing yourself, get out of your head, and just move, i.e., allow yourself to behave more fast and spontaneously. 

I wrote “depends” for the pace on mental toughness days. The reason being is that what is challenging for you may not be challenging for someone else. For instance, some of you struggle with “putting the pedal to the metal”; therefore, it will be more appropriately challenging for those of you on a mental toughness day to move fast. Whereas, others struggle moving slower or even holding positions for a longer period of time; therefore, going fast would be the path of least resistance and not nearly as challenging. 

My hope is that this formula S x B=R and thinking about each day of training in terms of What, Why, and How helps you to

  1. See each day of programming as being much more intentional than just exercises to be checked off
  2. Gives you a more strategic and tactical sense of how to approach workouts given the context of the day.

In part 2 of this post, I will dive into considering the intersection between the external context of the day (practice, competition, mental toughness) and your internal, personally relevant context. 


Tuesday
Practice
A) 6 RFQ :40:20
     Min 1: 6-12 Kipping Pull Ups
     Min 2: Seated Lateral MB Toss
     Min 3: 5-7 Hang Power Cleans @ 7-8 RPE
B) Partner AMRAP 4:
     MAX EFFORT D-Ball Ground To Over Shoulder

Wednesday
“Fight Gone Bad”
 3 Rounds :60 each
 Wall Balls (20/14)
 Sumo deadlift high pull (75/55)
 Box Jump (20)
 Push Press (75/55)
 Row for cals
 1min rest

 

Fundamentals:

Don’t forget about them. This is the foundation to your house. Drill these down and develop strength.

You want to do kipping pull ups? First, make sure you have adequate amount of strength to do a strict pull up. You want to back squat 300+lbs? First look at your bodyweight squat. You want to do handstand push ups? First work on your push ups. 

 

While working on the fundamentals of movement might not be super sexy, it’s what allows for your body to thrive for the long haul. Mix in plenty of sleep, a clean diet, and consistent mobility, you’ll be doing what you love for a very long time!


Tuesday – Competition

AMRAP 5:
12 Lateral Burpees
6 Deadlifts (225/155)

Rest 3 Minutes

AMRAP 4:
12 Lateral Burpees
6 Deadlifts (275/195)

Rest 2 Minutes

AMRAP 3:
12 Lateral Burpees
6 Deadlifts (315/220)

Score = Total Rounds + Reps

Wednesday – Practice 

A) AMRAP 15:
20 Cal Row
10 DBall Squats
12 TTB
6 DBall Up and Over

B) 3 on 3:00
2 lengths Pinch Grip Plate Carry
Bar Hang Till :90

http://

Come For The Workout Stay For The Coffee from Kenny Kane on Vimeo.

Monday’s Workout
Practice

A) 3 RFQ:
     7 Tempo Back Squats 3131
     7 Hang Power Snatches
     Max effort high knees on breath hold
     *Rest coach’s interval

B) EMOM 10:
     Odds: 8 Hang Power Snatches
     Even: 5 Bar Muscle-ups

C) Box Squats

Tuesday’s Workout
Competition

AMRAP 5:
     12 Lateral Burpees
     6 Deadlifts (225/155)
     *Rest 3 Minutes
AMRAP 4:
     12 Lateral Burpees
     6 Deadlifts (275/195)
     *Rest 2 Minutes
AMRAP 3:
     12 Lateral Burpees
     6 Deadlifts (315/220)

Score = Total Rounds + Reps

CrossFit Games Open Workouts 19.1, 19.2, and 19.3 are in the books. Two weekends and two workouts remain. Make a point to get into the gym on Saturday to attack 19.4. Do not be dissuaded by the movements – like everything else, it can be scaled to your capacity. Choose to do these challenging workouts, because people like us do things like this.

___________

THURSDAY

PRACTICE

A) 6 RFQ :40:20

     Double Unders

     C2B Pull-ups

B) 5 Rounds of: AMRAP 2:

     10 Hang Power Cleans (135/95)

     15 DB Thrusters (50/35)

     Rest 1 minute between rounds

FRIDAY

COMPETITION

Franklin Hill “Up, Over, Around and Up”

2 Rounds on the 15:00

WEDNESDAY – MENTAL TOUGHNESS

“Silber Lining” FT
400m Run
12 Alt Pistols
16 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
20 DB Russian Twists
800m Run
24 Alt Pistols
32 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
40 DB Russian Twists
1250m Run
36 Alt Pistols
48 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
60 DB Russian Twists

(40 min cap)


THURSDAY – PRACTICE

A) 6 RFQ :40:20
Double Unders
C2B

B) 5 Rounds of:
AMRAP 2: 10
Hang Power Cleans (135/95)
15 DB Thrusters (50/35)

Rest 1 minute between rounds


 

Well, for one, Austyn has been a kickass member of Oak Park for the past 8 and a half months. Many of you have gotten to throw down beside her.

When I first met Austyn last summer, I immediately picked up on how deeply she cares,  thinks about, and is invested in her own growth, so she can better serve the athletes she works with as an Athletic Trainer. This type of drive that Austyn has resonates and inspires me. Therefore, I knew shortly after meeting her that I wanted to get her on my podcast: Behind the Podium–Unveiling the Coach

The finished product is here (you can also find on iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Play), and I am excited to have our Oak Park community learn more about Austyn from my interview of her. For some additional context, we recorded this last August. 

We cover:

  • How to serve your clients from a physical and mental standpoint
  • Why letting go of perfection can help you move closer towards your bigger purpose
  • Why letting your clients take ownership of their healing can help you help them
  • How to help clients when their motivation is waning
  • Why learning to listen can be your greatest asset
  • Why it’s important to be strong in your weak points

Tuesday
Practice 
A) Ski Erg
    -Sprint start into 21 Cal (Gear 3)
    -Sprint start into 9 Cal (Gear 5)
B) Weighted Pull-up
    -Build to a heavy 2
C) 4RFQ :60:30
    -Weighted Squat/Lunge Complex
    -Max Cal Row (fewest strokes)

Wednesday
Mental Toughness
“Silber Lining”
     FT
    400m Run
    12 Alt Pistols
    16 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
    20 DB Russian Twists
    800m Run
    24 Alt Pistols
    32 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
    40 DB Russian Twists
    1250m Run
    36 Alt Pistols
    48 DB Renegade Rows (35/20)
    60 DB Russian Twists (40 min cap)