SxB=R is a very practical formula I refer to as a way to help myself and others align behaviors with desired outcome (s) (result). Moreover, this formula takes into account how a desired outcome is influenced by context (situation). 

Let’s consider this formula as it pertains to our programming (practice, competition, and mental toughness days) at Oak Park. 

Situation Behavior Result
Practice Pace: Slow/systematic; Priority: Task, process, goal oriented LEARN
Competition Pace: Fast/spontaneous; Priority: Outcome, ego oriented TEST
Mental Toughness Pace: Depends on student
Priority: Goal oriented specific to the challenge
CHALLENGE

Notice that the primary desired outcome for each of the contexts is different. This does NOT imply that practice days can’t be challenging nor does it imply that you cannot learn something valuable on a competition day. The point is that in order for you to get the most out of the context, you have to understand the main purpose of the context, i.e., the WHY.

Why do we practice? We practice, so that we can learn. The learning is often specific to the contents of that day and specific to the growth needs of the student.

Why do we compete? We compete, so that we can test our abilities and capacities against others and/or against a previous version of ourselves. While the gray area of process is important, so is the black/white of measuring one’s ability very specifically with hard numerics, e.g., how much weight did you lift versus how did the technique of that lift look (more valuable question on a practice day).

It can be more difficult for people to understand the difference between a mental toughness day and a competition day. Therefore, I find this definition helpful: Mental toughness is about purposefully digging yourself into a hole to see how well you can get out of it. Pragmatically, on a competition day, it would not make any sense to dig yourself into a hole because you are trying to “win”. This nuance is important because it helps to understand why we program mental toughness days the way we do, AND how you can get more out of mental toughness days by being more deliberate about how you choose to behave in the workout that is most aligned with challenging yourself.

The context of a workout refers to WHAT, the associative, desired outcome refers to WHY, and the behaviors are HOW you go about achieving that desired outcome.

There are an infinite number of behaviors that can be considered, especially when taking into account the infinite ways a workout can be designed. What I have done in the chart above is give you two main filters of behavior (priority and pace). Again, just like how practice days aren’t only intended for you to learn something, the priority and pace listed for practice, competition, and mental toughness days are NOT ALWAYS appropriate given the workout but, for the most part, they are the behaviors best in service of honoring the primary desired outcome–learn, test, or challenge.

When the desired outcome is learning, it is most fitting to prioritize the task and process specific to the goal of that practice day, and, often, the best way to do that is for your pace of movement to be slower and more systematic. 

Whereas, when it comes time to testing yourself, get out of your head, and just move, i.e., allow yourself to behave more fast and spontaneously. 

I wrote “depends” for the pace on mental toughness days. The reason being is that what is challenging for you may not be challenging for someone else. For instance, some of you struggle with “putting the pedal to the metal”; therefore, it will be more appropriately challenging for those of you on a mental toughness day to move fast. Whereas, others struggle moving slower or even holding positions for a longer period of time; therefore, going fast would be the path of least resistance and not nearly as challenging. 

My hope is that this formula S x B=R and thinking about each day of training in terms of What, Why, and How helps you to 1) see each day of programming as being much more intentional than just exercises to be checked off, and 2) gives you a more strategic and tactical sense of how to approach workouts given the context of the day. In part 2 of this post, I will dive into considering the intersection between the external context of the day (practice, competition, mental toughness) and your internal, personally relevant context. 


Tuesday
Practice
A) 5 RFQ :40:20
  Sumo Deadlifts @ 50-65%
  Jump Rope (Gear 2)
B) 5 RFQT:
  12 DB Front Squats (50/35) (G4/G5)
  Run 300m (G3)
C) Reflect

Wednesday
Practice
A) QAMRAP 10:
  3 Strict Pullups, 6 Kipping Pullup
  3 Tempo Pushups (3-2-1), 6 Plyo/Reg Pushups
 250m Row (Around 22 SR), 250m (Above 25 SR)
B) 3×3 Floating Snatch Pull
C) 3×3 Low Hang Snatch High Pull
D) 4x 1 Hang Snatch, 1 Snatch, 2 OHS

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